History, Political Science & Law

Upcoming Courses

Courses

Virginians have a chance to join the ranks of a dozen other states who have fundamentally changed how they draw voting districts. The dynamics in this movement have changed quite a bit with a new power structure in the General Assembly, but OneVirginia2021's mission has stayed the same: bipartisan redistricting reform with transparency and protection for our minority communities.


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Join this class to explore the life of Claudette Colvin who on March 2, 1955, at age 15 refused to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Alabama bus nine months before the much more remembered Rosa Parks. Why did the local NAACP officials not support Colvin following her arrest, but did support Parks? Also, we will discuss the ensuing Montgomery Bus Boycott which became a pivotal moment in the Civil Rights Movement.


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In this class, we will navigate the Legislative Information System (http://lis.virginia.gov/) and Virginia's Freedom of Information Act to show you how you can identify, track and lobby on legislation, and access government records and meetings.


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While there are many misconceptions about Islam and Muslims, the most common and prevalent have been chosen for a detailed study. Each misconception will be explained through historical references, verses from the Quran, and strong Prophetic traditions.


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Learn how to identify, avoid, and respond to frauds and scams. This talk will include a discussion of common types of fraud, including telemarketing, mail, and internet fraud; credit card fraud; and identity theft.


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Tune in for a reflective talk on the role government plays in responding to disasters, both natural and manmade, by the former Chief of Staff to Virginia Governors Warner and Kaine. From hurricanes to school shootings, citizens rely on their government to respond. What is that framework and what should citizens expect? Using real-life examples and personal stories, this session is designed to provide a glimpse into how government mobilizes during disasters.


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The Chinese Peranakans are an intriguing, but relatively unknown ethnic group. This class will explore the Chinese that sailed south to the Malay archipelago and specifically to Singapore. Their unique culture was a mix of Chinese and Malay beliefs, customs and values with some British Colonial influence. They became very wealthy and lived an opulent lifestyle that you will learn about and see in their homes, furniture, jewelry, and clothing.


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This is a sequel to the series offered several times for Osher on the deaths and funerals of Presidents who were born in Virginia and those who were assassinated. This series focuses on some nineteenth-century Presidents who are not so well known: specifically, John Adams, John Quincy Adams, Martin Van Buren, Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, and Andrew Johnson.


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This course will provide students with an introduction to the Library of Virginia, explore how to navigate the Library's website and catalog, and offer tips on how to begin genealogical research and specific records to use, particularly the digital collections available on Virginia Memory.


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Come explore the rich tapestry of African-American history In Petersburg, dating back to the late 18th century.


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Follow the Islamic Caliphate expansion into the Iberian Peninsula in the post-classical period. Discuss the influence of the Islamic culture upon the civilization which developed in this region and by extension, the rest of Western Europe. Examine the three major western religions during the 'convivencia' period of al-Andalus. Follow the centuries-long Christian Reconquista and its importance in the national identity of Spain.


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We'll examine the erosion of government and the implementation of Nazi rule as the rights of citizenship were erased along with millions of people. How did a country often labeled as sophisticated become the incubator for the targeted destruction of millions? Why did ordinary citizens become focal point of brutality and hatred? Why did 'us vs. them' define neighbors? How do we view this history here and now in 2020?


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US recognition of Israel was highly controversial. After a brief review of the background of the establishment of Israel in May 1948 we will analyze arguments for and against recognition, focusing on why and by whom they were made. Our key question is whether Truman's decision was in the US national interest.


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Join us for a behind-the-scenes view of the planning, coordination, and execution of the Queen's visit to Virginia in 2007. Learn of the intense planning and ultimate pageantry of this once-in-a-lifetime event.


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This look at Jim Crow practices in Virginia and the nation in the early-to-mid 20th century explores their enduring legacy in educational and housing segregation in the Richmond area.


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In 1907, President Theodore Roosevelt sent 16 of the country's most modern battleships on a 14-month cruise around the world, visiting ports on six continents. This course will look at Roosevelt's motivations in sending the fleet around the world, as well as the cruise itself and its aftermath. And, there will be a lot of pictures.


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Using Smithsonian American Art Museum artworks, this session will explore America from its earliest days as a British colony to its birth as a new nation.


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The Great Depression of the early 20th century was a time of hardship and deprivation countered by one of the greatest period of government support for the arts in U.S. history.


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Artists depict the cultural, social and political climate of their times. How can their artworks enrich our understanding of American history? Using Smithsonian American Art Museum artworks, this session will explore the forces that influences the emerging American identity: the great expanse of western frontier, the growth of the agricultural economy, and the rise of industry.


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This two-part course covers George Wythe's significant role in getting America off to the right start at the nation's beginning. Content will be based on the George Wythe biography 'Jefferson's Godfather: The Man Behind the Man,' by Suzanne Munson.


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What changed in the Cold War that enabled the U.S. to bring about the remarkable end to the Cold War without firing a shot directly at an enemy?


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The United States is a maritime nation whose Navy has always been integral to its existence: first as a small but up-and-coming trading nation, then as one of the world's 'Great Nations,' and finally as a super power. Throughout, the Navy's changes and progression have mirrored and paralleled the nation's. This course is a survey of that transformation from a small maritime defense force into the most powerful Navy in history.


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There's some interesting background associated with the University's move to an entirely new campus more than a hundred years ago. We'll look at the dominant aesthetic, the involvement of a renowned architect, some history of the property, and historical/political influences of the time.


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Explore the formation of the Judaean 'kingdom' as part of a United Monarch in the 10th century BCE, one of the most debated periods in the biblical and archaeological record. Recent excavations in Jerusalem have shed a tremendous amount of light on the period. It will be a goal to review this material alongside the biblical record to seek historical clarity for the emergence of the Kingdom of Judah.


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This course will review some significant Supreme Court decisions since 1970, while questioning whether the Court has deserved its long-held reputation in civic lore as an institutional bulwark protecting the rights of poor and marginalized Americans. The course will also consider how recent Court appointments and the upcoming election might affect the future direction of the Court.


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The presenters recount by photos and reflections their ten-day road trip in February 2020 along sections of the US Civil Rights Trail: Nashville, Memphis, Little Rock, and multiple cities in Mississippi and Alabama, offered as an invitation to others to experience this new national treasure for themselves.


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This class is a survey of the Medieval Period, 395 AD to 1500 AD. It will examine the political, economic, social, and intellectual heritage of the Middle Ages. How did Western Europe become the most dominant region on the globe, and what can we learn from its evolution from a backward, invasion-ravaged area to conqueror of the world?


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