Professional Enrollment

Courses & Events

This course brings students to the next level of understanding of the impact and role of various identities within the Deaf communities on the international and national levels, following the framework of intersectionality. Intersectionality conceptualizes the various identities, ethnicities, linguistic uses and experiences of persons, groups of people, or social problems in the world of deaf. Intersectionality looks at deaf people's overlapping identities and experiences in order to understand the complexity of prejudices they face due to their deaf, race, class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, and other identity markers.

This course is eligible for RID CEUs as Academic Coursework. Getting this course offered as a "sponsor initiated activity" is being explored.


This course contains no sessions
This course is the expanded study of ASL IV with emphasis on increased conversation skills, vocabulary, storytelling, knowledge of Deaf culture and the Deaf community. Vocabulary is enhanced through the introduction of various content areas dealing with current events, world affairs, literature, the arts and abstract ideas. Students participate in-group discussions, speculate, make analogies, give instructions, and express feelings and intentions.


This course contains no sessions
This course is continuing from ASLD 505 ASL V. Students focus on discourse, variation in sign language use, and understanding how the Deaf community is part of a linguistic and cultural minority. Topics that will be covered include perspectives on Deafhood, attitudes toward Deaf people and signed languages, technology and communication. Students will expand on vocabulary by working on areas of advanced subject matter, application of non-manual markers, use of classifiers, and proper pronominalization.


This course contains no sessions
This course focuses on analysis of ASL Discourse structure and features, such as use of space for cohesion, depiction, discourse markers, and use of classifiers. The course also focuses on the use of ASL discourse in formal and informal settings. Students study the genres of dialogues, public speaking, artistic expression, debate, persuasive and narrative styles in ASL.


This course contains no sessions
This course examines ethics as it relates to the work of interpreting through study of ethical codes of conduct, models of decision-making and elements of becoming an ethical professional. Students will come to understand the complexities of ethical decision-making and the importance of self-awareness, reflective practice and responsibility as they consider implications on micro and macro levels. This class will require the completion of case studies, presentation and reflection papers.

This course is eligible for RID CEUs as Academic Coursework. Getting this course offered as a "sponsor initiated activity" is being explored.


This course contains no sessions
This course provides an introduction to real-time interpreting with an emphasis on ASL source materials through a lens of meaning-based analysis and co-construction of meaning. Students will come to understand and apply theories and engage in reflective practice. Students must have experience interpreting - either having completed interpreter training or be a working interpreter.This is a hands-on skill class - students will produce interpretations and engage in reflective practice through both self-assessment and peer assessment. A recording device and YouTube account are both required by the course.

This course is eligible for RID CEUs as Academic Coursework. Getting this course offered as a "sponsor initiated activity" is being explored.


This course contains no sessions