Locations

Topeka

Courses & Events
On Nov. 11, 1918, the United States and its allies signed an armistice with Germany to end fighting on land, sea and air. It was to take effect at 11 a.m. Paris time or "the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month," ending The Great War. Join us as we tour the museum and hear Dr. Robert Smith, curator of the Fort Riley Museum and veteran Osher instructor, review the events leading to the armistice and its aftermath.7 a.m. - Coach departs Meadowlark Hills (residents)7:15 a.m. - Depart Town Center lot8:15 a.m. - Depart Red Robbin (Topeka)9 a.m. - Depart Osher Institute10:30 a.m. - WWI Museum tour11:30 a.m. - Lunch in the Over There Café and touring on your own1:30 p.m. - Coach departs2:30 p.m. - Arrive at Osher3 p.m. - Arrive in Topeka3:45 p.m. - Arrive at Town Center4 p.m. - Arrive at Meadowlark Hills$95 fee includes transportation, presentation, tickets, tours and lunch.$70 fee includes presentation, tickets, tours and lunch (no transportation).Refund requests honored on or before Oct. 5, minus a $15 administrative fee.


Friday, October 12, 2018, National WWI Museum
There has been a lot of talk lately among politicians, pundits and news commentators--not to mention the general public--about apocalyptic passages in the Bible and what they might mean for our time. These are the texts describing the end of the world as we know it and the dawn of a new order. There has also been a recent flood of books and films depicting the final conflagration and the fate of unfortunates "left behind." In this course, we will examine selected writings from the Bible within their historical, social and cultural contexts to understand what they were saying, how they were understood in their own time, and how best to read them today.


October 10-24, 2018, Brewster Place
What better way to enjoy the sounds of the season than with a Canadian Brass Christmas? Now in its 47th year, the Canadian Brass has performed in virtually every major concert hall in the world, been seen by hundreds of millions of people on television and sold 2 million albums worldwide. Renowned for versatility and joyous performances, the award-winning Brass has elevated the art of the brass quintet. Join us for a pre-performance dinner and Canadian Brass preview by Dr. Paul Stevens, associate dean of the KU School of Music and associate professor, horn.


Sunday, December 9, 2018, Lied Center
Join Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg reading from her new novel Miriam's Well about mythology, history and finding our place, people and purpose. In this modern-day retelling of the Exodus, Miriam wanders the political and spiritual desert of a changing America, driven by her sense of purpose but searching for her place and her people. As she seeks the Promised Land, she shows her people, and eventually herself, how to turn the chaos and despair of our times into music, meals and miracles. The reading and discussion will be followed by a reception featuring recipes central to Miriam and other characters included in the novel.


Thursday, November 15, 2018, St Andrews Classroom
While almost everyone uses computers today, most of us have only a vague idea of how they actually work. Terms like "big data," "artificial intelligence," "cyber security" and "the internet of things" appear in news articles frequently, but are rarely more than superficially explained. Without some basic understanding of the inner workings of the computer, how are we to have reasonably formed opinions on these developments? This class will look at where computers came from, how they work, and where they might be going. The only class requirement is curiosity. No technical background is needed.


October 25, 2018 to November 8, 2018, Washburn University Henderson Learning Center
In celebration of the Lied Center's 25th Anniversary, the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis (JLCO) will premiere a new work commissioned by the Lied Center. Each of the 15 members of the JLCO will compose one movement to capture the spirit of a beloved KU basketball legend. This project represents the first time the JLCO has been commissioned to create a new work as a collective. The combination of the world's greatest jazz orchestra with the tradition of basketball that runs so deep at the University of Kansas will result in an unforgettable performance.The JLCO, comprising 15 of the finest jazz soloists and ensemble players today, has been the Jazz at Lincoln Center resident orchestra since 1988. Under Music Director Wynton Marsalis, the JLCO performs a vast repertoire, from rare historic compositions to Jazz at Lincoln Center-commissioned works, including compositions and arrangements by Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Fletcher Henderson, Thelonious Monk, Mary Lou Williams, Dizzy Gillespie, Benny Goodman, Charles Mingus and many others. Wynton Marsalis (music director, trumpet) is the managing and artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center. Marsalis made his recording debut as a leader in 1982 and has since recorded more than 70 jazz and classical albums, which have garnered him nine Grammy Awards. In 1997, Marsalis became the first jazz artist to be awarded the prestigious Pulitzer Prize in music.Through the generosity of private donors, each movement of the 25th Anniversary Commission is sponsored. Net proceeds of this project will help fund the Lied Center's Performing Arts Access Endowment, which will enable every student in Lawrence Public Schools to attend a world-class, age-specific performance on an annual basis.


Thursday, October 11, 2018, Lied Center
"Rethink: I Am a Veteran" is a performance and storytelling project centered on the lives of women veterans, their families, and friends. This project, which is designed and led by women artists, focuses on veterans who are women, sharing their first person experiences and delving into topics such as toxic masculinity, abuse, military glass ceilings, family life and sexuality.


Friday, November 9, 2018, Lawrence Arts Center
Kansas has been home to a variety of unique, colorful and important individuals. First will be Joseph G. McCoy, the entrepreneur who brought cattle from the fields of Texas to the railroads at Abilene, creating the iconic cowboy image. Next will be Tom Pendergast, whose political machine ran Kansas City for almost 30 years. William Allen White, editor of the Emporia Gazette, was an advisor to eight U.S. presidents. Finally, we'll focus on Dr. James Naismith, the inventor of basketball, and his years at the University of Kansas, including mentoring Hall of Famer John McLendon, who could not play at Kansas because he was African-American.


October 2-16, 2018, Washburn University Henderson Learning Center
This exhibition explores the artistic, political and ideological significance of Napoleon's imperial court. It aims to re-create the ambiance and capture the spirit that prevailed in the French court during the Empire. A selection of works, many never before exhibited in North America, will reveal the power and splendor of the Imperial Household and its role in fashioning a monarchic identity for the new emperor, his family and loyal entourage.9 a.m. - Coach departs Osher Institute10:15 a.m. - Docent-led Napoleon tour11:30 a.m. - Rozzelle Court lunch and touring on your own1:30 p.m. - Coach departs2:30 p.m. - Coach arrives at Osher$95 fee includes transportation, tickets, tours and lunch.$70 fee includes, tickets, tours and lunch (no transportation).Requests for refund will be honored on or before Nov. 9, minus a $15 administrative fee.?


Friday, November 16, 2018, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
Based in part on A History of The World in 6 Glasses by Tom Standage, we'll travel the world in search of the hearths of tea, coffee, beer, wine, spirits and sodas, and then explore how, why and where they diffused. Taught in two parts, the course emphasizes aspects of globalization from the Stone Age beer makers to the cola giants of the modern era. Historic themes include tea and the Opium Wars; sugar, rum and the slave trade; and wine, Christianity and Islam. Part I: spirits, beer and wine.


September 12-26, 2018, Brewster Place
October 11-25, 2018, Tallgrass Creek Retirement Community
This adaptation of Robert James Waller's bestselling novel earned a Tony Award for Best Original Score. It's 1965 in Winterset, Iowa, where Italian war bride Francesca Johnson has been living a largely unfulfilling farm life when her husband, son and daughter leave to attend a 4-H show. Francesca's quiet weekend is upended when photographer Robert Kincaid appears asking directions to one of the county's famed covered bridges. Her well-intended hospitality to a stranger turns both their lives upside down.


Thursday, September 27, 2018, Theatre Lawrence
This course will examine the crucial eastern theater of the Civil War. First we'll review the first two years of the war where Confederate tactical dominance consistently defeated larger Union armies. Then we'll review the pivotal year 1863 and Lee and Jackson's great victory at Chancellorsville and the war's great turning-point with the Union's victory at Gettysburg. Finally, we'll look in depth at Grant's assumption of command in the east and his brilliant "overland campaign" culminating in the siege of Petersburg and the South's surrender at Appomattox. In addition to the emphasis on the military campaign, the social and political events in the east will also be discussed.


October 4-18, 2018, Washburn University Henderson Learning Center
With a Stetson on your head and boots on your feet, you could be anywhere in the world and people would immediately assume you were an American. The cattle were in Texas, the cow towns were in Kansas, and it was on the epic drives up the Old Chisholm Trail after the Civil War that the cowboy was transformed from a drover into the mythic hero of American popular culture and one of the most recognizable symbols of our country. Kansas also contributed the cowboy hat, cowboy boots, the first cowgirl, and "The Streets of Laredo" to the cowboy mystique.


October 16-30, 2018, Aldersgate Village Manchester Lodge