Courses

This class will discuss the consequences of choosing whether to tell a story in fictional or nonfictional form, the differences between these forms, the ethics involved in writing true stories, and the use of perspective. Students will engage in point of view and perception exercises, and each student will produce fiction and nonfiction writing.


November 9-16, 2019, HCC 0190
Create a unique and special keepsake to remember a special trip or time in your life. Learn memoir and travel writing techniques by using a series of writing and memory prompts. In this class, you will write several small pieces that can be polished and integrated with items from a trip or event.


August 17-24, 2019, RDM3 306
Want to write characters that readers never forget? Join award-winning author Kat Mattingly for an in-depth look at how to make your heroes and heroines come to life on the page. We'll study the art of penning interesting, relatable protagonists and villains for your fiction novel or memoir. Learn to write active, effective dialogue, format a main character arc and show satisfying hero growth.


October 15, 2019 to November 19, 2019, RTEC 224
Creative writing is any form of writing which is written with the creativity of mind: fiction writing, poetry writing, creative nonfiction writing and more. The purpose is to express something, whether it be feelings, thoughts, or emotions. If you have always thought you had a book or memoir in you, or just want to write for fun and relaxation, this is the class for you. We will explore different genres of writing using select readings and writing exercises and learn the principles of workshopping creative writing and share writing with one another.


This course contains no sessions at this time.
Ray Bradbury said: "Plot is no more than footprints left in the snow after your characters have run by on their way to incredible destinations." In this workshop, we'll learn how to create characters, wind them up, and let them go-our only job is to try to keep up with them. We'll learn techniques and exercises to let our characters do all the work for us.


December 7-14, 2019, HCC 0230
Who is actually telling the story? To whom are they telling it? And why are they telling it? These are three questions that we should ask of everything we write. In this writing workshop, we'll learn the difference between the character, the narrator, and the writer, and discover ways to have each of them be a more effective story teller (fiction or nonfiction).


Saturday, November 23, 2019, HCC 0230
Avoid spoon-feeding your readers too much exposition and invite them deep into your story. In this Creative Writing Workshop, we'll draw on techniques from prose and poetry that emotionally engage readers and allow them their own discovery while maintaining clarity. We'll look at examples of absorbing prose and poetry, and work with prompts and exercises that help us build a mutually rewarding relationship with our audience.


This course contains no sessions at this time.
In this workshop, we'll look at using plot points to create works of fiction and nonfiction. We'll also look at the pros and cons of outlining our work vs. letting it all hang out, and participate in writing exercises that help us understand how we can manage both sides of the coin.


Saturday, October 12, 2019, HCC 0260
This four-hour food writing workshop will encompass readings, writing exercises, sharing work, and discussion of writing practices and resources. This workshop is designed to bring creativity into the world of food-writing, or more specifically, to use food as a subject for creative writing.


Saturday, October 19, 2019, HCC 0230
Generative writing workshops provide time and space to create new work inspired by writing prompts, craft discussions, and sharing work. They stretch your writing practice by introducing new frameworks and forms, spark fresh ideas or dig up buried memories, and offer a place to share fellowship with other writers. Each month, we will explore a theme through reading short pieces of writing, engaging in silent writing to suggested prompts, and sharing our raw (but often exciting!) pieces with one another. Take them individually or register for the series and save $28.


October 20, 2019 to December 8, 2019, RDM3 306
Generative writing workshops provide time and space to create new work inspired by writing prompts, craft discussions, and sharing work. They stretch your writing practice by introducing new frameworks and forms, spark fresh ideas or dig up buried memories, and offer a place to share fellowship with other writers. Each month, we will explore a theme through reading short pieces of writing, engaging in silent writing to suggested prompts, and sharing our raw (but often exciting!) pieces with one another. Whether students attend one or several of these workshops, they will assemble a portfolio of project ideas and short works-in-progress. Writers of all levels, in all genres are welcome. Workshops are not progressive, so students can choose the monthly workshops that appeal to them or can attend all as part of a regular writing practice.


This course contains no sessions at this time.
Generative writing workshops provide time and space to create new work inspired by writing prompts, craft discussions, and sharing work. They stretch your writing practice by introducing new frameworks and forms, spark fresh ideas or dig up buried memories, and offer a place to share fellowship with other writers. Each month, we will explore a theme through reading short pieces of writing, engaging in silent writing to suggested prompts, and sharing our raw (but often exciting!) pieces with one another. December 8: "Beat Spirit": We will use some of the techniques of the Beat writers (many of them "borrowed" from the Surrealist writers!) to get in touch with our inner cool cats. Expect to play with word collage, collaborative writing exercises, and automatic writing.


Sunday, December 8, 2019, RDM3 306
Generative writing workshops provide time and space to create new work inspired by writing prompts, craft discussions, and sharing work. They stretch your writing practice by introducing new frameworks and forms, spark fresh ideas or dig up buried memories, and offer a place to share fellowship with other writers. November 17 topic: "Ghosting." We will explore pieces and prompts that play with the idea of the unseen or the missing. (Not necessarily the paranormal!)


Sunday, November 17, 2019, RDM3 306
Generative writing workshops provide time and space to create new work inspired by writing prompts, craft discussions, and sharing work. They stretch your writing practice by introducing new frameworks and forms, spark fresh ideas or dig up buried memories, and offer a place to share fellowship with other writers. Each month, we will explore a theme through reading short pieces of writing, engaging in silent writing to suggested prompts, and sharing our raw (but often exciting!) pieces with one another.


This course contains no sessions at this time.
Generative writing workshops provide time and space to create new work inspired by writing prompts, craft discussions, and sharing work. They stretch your writing practice by introducing new frameworks and forms, spark fresh ideas or dig up buried memories, and offer a place to share fellowship with other writers. Each month, we will explore a theme through reading short pieces of writing, engaging in silent writing to suggested prompts, and sharing our raw (but often exciting!) pieces with one another.


This course contains no sessions at this time.
Generative writing workshops provide time and space to create new work inspired by writing prompts, craft discussions, and sharing work. They stretch your writing practice by introducing new frameworks and forms, spark fresh ideas or dig up buried memories, and offer a place to share fellowship with other writers. October 20 topic: "Writing What You See." We will use a variety of images to create characters, settings, and inspire scenes


This course contains no sessions at this time.
Generative writing workshops provide time and space to create new work inspired by writing prompts, craft discussions, and sharing work. They stretch your writing practice by introducing new frameworks and forms, spark fresh ideas or dig up buried memories, and offer a place to share fellowship with other writers. October 20 topic: "Writing What You See." We will use a variety of images to create characters, settings, and inspire scenes.


Sunday, October 20, 2019, RDM3 306
Would you like to earn money by working from home (or anywhere else) via computer? This one-of-a-kind workshop shows you how to turn your talent for writing into money in the bank.



August 1-22, 2019, SCI 0190
Looking for a way to earn money from home? This one-of-a-kind workshop shows you how to turn your talent for writing into money in the bank. We'll zoom in on exactly how to create content that sells and where to find publishers who will pay well for your work. Get coached by a seasoned pro writer who reveals the best path to take and the dead ends to avoid.


October 1, 2019 to December 3, 2019, SCI 0190
Join traditionally published and award-winning author Kat Mattingly for invaluable information on how to get an agent and publisher. Kat will show you how to identify what agents are looking for in your novel, how to write a compelling synopsis and query letter, and how to give an accurate, intriguing novel pitch. Come learn the dos and don'ts of querying agents!


October 15, 2019 to November 5, 2019, RTEC 224
Award-winning author and college educator  Kathryn Mattingly will introduce you to the art of novel writing. Explore the essential building blocks for the fiction book or memoir you might wish to pen one day. Plot, setting, theme, characterization, point of view and dialogue will all be covered.


August 7-28, 2019, RTEC 224
Good writing of any kind benefits from clarity, precision, and fresh language. Poetry can help! Perfect the well-crafted line, sharpen your imagery, and get the emotional impact you're after with prompts, exercises, and techniques borrowed from poetry to up your prose writing game.


Saturday, December 7, 2019, HCC 0190
In this workshop, students will gain inspiration from contemporary poets who embrace a variety of forms. Learn to follow prompts to see where they will lead you and feed your fertile imagination sufficiently to fill a new notebook or MacBook with fresh and nourishing poems.


Saturday, November 23, 2019, HCC 0260
Good writing of any kind benefits from clarity, precision, and fresh language, and poetry can help! Perfect the well-crafted line, sharpen your imagery, and get the emotional impact you're after with prompts, exercises, and techniques borrowed from poetry to up your writing game, whatever your genre. 


This course contains no sessions at this time.
Self-publish your novel, memoir, book of poetry or artwork. In this workshop series, you'll learn how to format your manuscript for a professional-looking interior, design covers that catch readers' eyes in print and online, and use print-on-demand (POD) services to distribute the finished product.


October 5-26, 2019, BEC 0156
Whether you're a singer, musician, writer, poet, or a combination of all those gifts, this could be the class for you. Each week, we'll cover a topic on the mechanics of songwriting. After that, there will be time for hands-on practice of the techniques covered.


October 12-26, 2019, SCI 0190
Join award-winning author and college educator Kat Mattingly for an in-depth class on the art of storytelling. Choosing the correct voice for your novel or memoir will be covered, along with exploring your themes, enriching your settings, and writing a correct timeline for your book. Each one of these elements can help elevate and strengthen your story, allowing it to resonate better with readers.


October 17, 2019 to November 21, 2019, CAS 118
Learn the art and science of writing foundation grants for your nonprofit in this hands-on course. Start with the basics of researching and applying for foundation grant funding. Then move to the development of a two-page Letter of Inquiry and additional components of a grant application.


September 23, 2019 to October 14, 2019, CHLAB 301
Would you like to take your short stories to the next level? Let's analyze how to make that happen! This class will teach you all the skills you need to create short stories with greater impact. Award-winning author and college educator Kat Mattingly will focus on 'raising the stakes' regarding your plot, along with how to create powerful characters and compelling dialogue.


October 17, 2019 to November 21, 2019, CAS 118