Course Detail: BREW105 - BREWING I: FROM RAW MATERIALS TO FERMENTABLE WORT

BREWING I: FROM RAW MATERIALS TO FERMENTABLE WORT:
This interdisciplinary course provides an in-depth exploration of the chemical and biochemical processes fundamental to the different stages of the brewing process. Topics will include water chemistry, malting and grain processing, the organic chemistry of hops, and the biochemistry of wort production. Integral to the course is the exploration of how fundamental chemical and biochemical processes affect different aspects of the brewing process as well as specific qualities of the beer produced.

Learning Objectives-Students completing this course will learn, understand and know about:

Malting
  • Barley physiology and productionPolysaccharide structure, including both structural and storage components of barley
  • The enzymes responsible for degradation of barley cell walls, associated enzyme mechanisms and the effects of physical parameters on enzyme activity (e.g. temperature, pH)
  • The enzymes responsible for degradation of storage polysaccharides, associated enzyme mechanisms and the effects of physical parameters on enzyme activity (e.g. temperature, pH)
  • Reactions between sugars/polysaccharides and amines/proteins that lead to the development of color and flavor in malt (Maillard chemistry): mechanisms, product structures, and analytical methods to monitor these processes
Mashing
  • Water chemistry and the importance of pH, ionic composition
  • Sources of water and the resulting impact on pH and ionic composition; chemical approaches to altering water chemistry to improve characteristics for mashing and brewing in general
  • Conversion of polysaccharides to oligosaccharides and simple sugars: alpha and beta Amylases -  substrate specificity, reaction mechanisms and the effects of physical parameters on enzyme activity (e.g. temperature, pH)
  • Physical processes involving material and heat transfer and separations
Hops
  • Hop physiology and production
  • Hop processing and advanced hop products
  • Structure and reactions of the bittering compounds in hops:  alpha and beta acids
  • Structures and reactions the aroma components in hop: terpenes, terpenoids, and other organic hop constituents
  • Fundamentals of the physiology/biochemistry of taste and smellHow process effects the bitterness and aroma characteristics of beer
A basic understanding of organic chemistry will be useful for students in this course.  

75 MINUTE recorded lectures of each class will be made available weekly on Tuesdays and Thursdays.  A weekly one hour live synchronous class for questions and discussion is scheduled each Mondays at 6:30 for the duration of the course.

This course is not limited to UMBC students and is open to the general public.

Available Sessions - Click on date(s) below