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Using type specimens, printed ephemera, and design examples from the Library of Congress digital collections, participants will trace histories, narratives, and connection in parallel with our diverse cultural experiences and visual language. The invention of movable type created an explosion of shared knowledge, history, and visual language that continues to evolve in contemporary culture. This course will explore meaning and subject matter through type design. Collaborative exercises will encourage participant to think critically about how type and design shapes our language and visual culture. Site visits include collections in the Philadelphia region, and guest lectures. Content is appropriate to a range of subject areas, from art and design, to literacy, history, science and technology.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Using type specimens, printed ephemera, and design examples from the Library of Congress digital collections, participants will trace histories, narratives, and connection in parallel with our diverse cultural experiences and visual language. The invention of movable type created an explosion of shared knowledge, history, and visual language that continues to evolve in contemporary culture. This course will explore meaning and subject matter through type design. Collaborative exercises will encourage participant to think critically about how type and design shapes our language and visual culture. Site visits include collections in the Philadelphia region, and guest lectures. Content is appropriate to a range of subject areas, from art and design, to literacy, history, science and technology.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
This course provides a general overview of the history of comics and graphic novels, particularly as a medium for storytelling and social commentary in the United States, using the resources of the Library of Congress. Participants consider visual literacy, basic narrative techniques, the combination of image and text, as historical context to better understand and analyze this art form. Participants in this course will plan lessons around this visual resource, exploring the potential impact to engage students with discussions and creative activities. Projects include researching and evaluating comic resources, group readings and discussions, hands-on drawing and printing activities, lesson plan development and more. Content is appropriate to a range of subject areas as connections to history, social science, identity, artistic expression and visual literacy are explored.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
This course provides a general overview of the history of comics and graphic novels, particularly as a medium for storytelling and social commentary in the United States, using the resources of the Library of Congress. Participants consider visual literacy, basic narrative techniques, the combination of image and text, as well as historical context to better understand and analyze this art form. Participants in this course will plan lessons around this visual resource, exploring the potential impact to engage students with discussions and creative activities. Projects include researching and evaluating comic resources, group readings and discussions, hands-on drawing and printing activities, lesson plan development and more. Content is appropriate to a range of subject areas as connections to history, social science, identity, artistic expression and visual literacy are explored.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Gain a thorough understanding of Design Thinking principles through hands-on techniques and exercises to take back to the classroom. Course participants will prototype solutions to problems of practice. Central to the course is the question, how can Design Thinking be used to teach 21st century skills creativity, communication, collaboration, and critical thinking?


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Teachers, librarians and reading specialists can learn to enrich student awareness and appreciation of diverse cultures though literature centered on the experiences of African American, Hispanic, Asian and Middle Eastern cultures. Participants read Zora Neale Hurston, Chris Soentpiet, Faith Ringgold, Mildred D. Taylor and the poetry of Joyce Carol Thomas, Paul Laurence Dunbar and Langston Hughes, focusing on their incorporation into cross-curricular studies.


February 1, 2020 to March 21, 2020, TBA - University of the Arts
This course outlines the fundamentals of Adobe Photoshop for use in middle and high school classrooms. Participants will develop practical strategies to integrate software skills into lessons as a foundation for ongoing design exploration with students. Participants will learn the basics of image resolution, scanning, image import/export, print setup, and photo adjustments. Participants will gain an understanding of how this design program works for different types of design projects and the ability to create basic design projects and activities that reinforce concepts, vocabulary, and design principles to students in the classroom. Each day will include design lecture, software skill demonstration, and studio time for in-class exercises and projects. This in-class work will be supplemented with materials including video tutorials and readings.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Media education adds value to just about every curriculum in the K-12 classrooms. Media education has become a growing priority in today's classroom because of the extent of the media's importance in people's lives. However, many teachers are unaware of the necessity and the techniques for making media literacy an integral part of the K-12 educational experience. On average, children in their middle and high school years spend 6-10 hours a day engaged either actively or passively in a 'media related' activity. Because students, regardless of their learning style, attend more fully to activities and ideas that they connect with, the media is often used to influence them from a very young age. This makes it necessary for teachers to 'train' their students to analyze messages and understand the techniques utilized to influence them via a broad range of sound and visual communication technologies. Integrating Media Literacy into Today's K-12 Curriculum will teach educators how to incorporate media literacy into the classroom curriculum, regardless of the subject taught. This course will provide educators with the resources necessary to help students hone their critical thinking skills in a functional context so that they are able to recognize various marketing approaches, identify propaganda, understand stereotypes, critically evaluate media conveyed messages, and use the media as a tool for life-long learning.


February 24, 2020 to April 27, 2020, TBA - University of the Arts
Documentary films often depend on primary archival source  and later themselves become primary sources for studying the culture, technology, history and aesthetics of the time in which they were made. This course explores the role of archival sources within documentary through screenings, discussions and projects using the Library of Congress collection Selections from the National Film Registry.  Educators will produce a short film that draws upon this resource and, in the process, learn about research techniques, non-linear editing and ethics around archival usage. Lessons that may be brought forward to students include the artistic and/or historical possibilities of working with such resources and best practices for using online research tools. There will also be a discussion of rights and Fair Use.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Documentary films often depend on primary archival source  and later themselves become primary sources for studying the culture, technology, history and aesthetics of the time in which they were made. This course explores the role of archival sources within documentary through screenings, discussions and projects using the Library of Congress collection Selections from the National Film Registry.  Educators will produce a short film that draws upon this resource and, in the process, learn about research techniques, non-linear editing and ethics around archival usage. Lessons that may be brought forward to students include the artistic and/or historical possibilities of working with such resources and best practices for using online research tools. There will also be a discussion of rights and Fair Use.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Participants expand on printing projects using engraved plates and metal type from the University's collection of metal and wood typefaces. Create several printed works via typesetting and the Vandercook Proofing Press. Design custom polymer plates and perform multi-color printing. Participants consider how letterpress techniques and process can be taught to students in the K-12 classroom.


October 5-20, 2019, Anderson Hall Rm 615
The traditional art of printing from engraved plates and metal type is explored using the University's collection of metal and wood typefaces. Create several printed works via typesetting and the Vandercook Proofing Press. Design custom polymer plates and perform multi-color printing. Participants consider how letterpress techniques and process can be taught to students in the K-12 classroom.


October 5-20, 2019, Anderson Hall Rm 615
Participants expand on projects using stencil methods in screen printing with water-based inks. Course includes idea development and application of visual skills in expression of color, line and form through drawn, photographic or computer-generated stencil processes. emphasis is on the acquisition of personal expression and technical skills, within the capabilities of screen printed opaque and transparent colors. Content is applicable to K-12 art classrooms.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
This course is an introduction to methods in screen printing with water-based inks. Demonstrations in screen printing techniques are followed by hands-on work in stencil preparation, mixing of pigments, registration processes, pulling a print and presentation, including development and application of various hand-cut and photo stencils. Course includes idea development and application of visual skills in expression of color, line and form through drawn, photographic or computer-generated stencil processes. Emphasis is on the acquisition of personal expression and technical skills, within the capabilities of screen printed opaque and transparent colors. Content is applicable to K-12 art classrooms. 


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
STEM education is based four specific disciplines - science, technology, engineering and mathematics - taught in an interdisciplinary, applied approach. STEAM education recognizes that the arts is an essential part of developing creative and critical thinking skills. In this course, educators will connect with primary source collections and artists who take STEM to STEAM. Teaching with primary sources allows educators to design student-centered learning experiences focused on the development of critical skills and building content knowledge. Educators will examine primary sources from direct access to local collections as well as the digital resources made available by the Library of Congress. Site visits include collections in the Philadelphia region and a studio visit with a contemporary artist.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
STEM education is based four specific disciplines - science, technology, engineering and mathematics-taught in an interdisciplinary, applied approach. STEAM education recognizes that the arts is an essential part of developing creative and critical thinking skills. In this course, educators will connect with primary source collections and artists who take STEM to STEAM. Teaching with primary sources allows educators to design student-centered learning experiences focused on the development of critical skills and building content knowledge. Educators will examine primary sources from direct access to local collections as well as the digital resources made available by the Library of Congress. Site visits include collections in the Philadelphia region and a studio visit with a contemporary artist.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
How is literacy changing as a result of emerging visual and digital media and technologies? We will explore the implications of the constant cultural and technological shift for teaching and learning in the secondary classroom. How does what you do in the classroom impact your students' visual literacy- the ability to interpret, analyze, and evaluate visual images and underlying messages that images are attempting to convey? This course is designed for educators who are interested in conducting project-based inquiry using a variety of digital texts, tools and technologies. We will dive into current research to inform strategies to design and build challenging and engaging visual and digital learning opportunities for you and your students.


September 28, 2019 to November 23, 2019, TBA - University of the Arts
Children and young adults has grown up in a media-drenched environment, full of appropriation. It is second nature to young people to create and curate personal collections of these images. Collage and assemblage as an art practice seeks to recontextualize that collective imagery to be presented in thoughtful and communicative ways. In this course, educators will learn to create collages and assemblages that communicate a focused message. We will explore the ways in which collage and assemblage has been used across cultures and by various artists. We will discuss the environmental and socioeconomic benefits to the art form, using recycled, salvaged, and personal imagery and artifacts to create works of art. Educators will come away with a deep appreciation for meaning in everyday objects and materials for artistic expression. 


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Refine and improve techniques relating to digital photography, expanding overall photographic competency and aesthetic sensibility. Composition, lighting and subject are discussed and critiqued as participants create a cohesive body of work with the final goal a series of project-based photographs. Some basic postproduction techniques using Photoshop are introduced. Participants must bring a digital SLR camera and a portable storage device. (or have access to a cloud based image storage service.)


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Explore, refine and improve general techniques relating to digital photography, including camera functions, image storage and final output options. In addition, composition, lighting and subject are discussed and critiqued. Some basic post-production techniques using Photoshop are also introduced. Participants must bring a digital SLR camera and a portable storage device.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Expand drawing and painting skills at a more advanced level. Working from direct observation, including some figure models, participants improve perception and technical skills, working both in drawing media and in paint. Create a range of times pieces in basic drawing media such as charcoal, pencil, ink and conte crayon, then move on to more advanced work using acrylic paints. This course considers color theory, composition, painting technique, and the overall process and includes in-depth critiques.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
This drawing and painting course provides the opportunity to further refine color theory and design concepts using a variety of media at an advanced level. Apply an understanding composition and fluency with materials to work both in the abstract and from direct observation. Educators will focus on the refinement of a series of pieces to build a body of work that reflects an advanced understanding of techniques specific to the two-dimensional visual arts. Educators will develop drawing and painting activities to incorporate into projects for the K-12 classroom.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Drawing and painting are foundational skills for visual literacy and for developing an understanding of form, composition, light and color. Working from direct observation, including some figure models, participants improve perception and technical skills working both in drawing media and in paint. Create a range of timed pieces in basic drawing media such as charcoal, pencil, ink and conte crayon, then move on to more advanced work using acrylic paints. This course considers color theory,composition, painting technique, and the overall process.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.