UArts Professional & Continuing Education Course Registration

Teaching with Primary Sources Courses at the University of the Arts

TPS 2019 course dates: Monday, August 5 - Friday, August 9, 2019 | 9:00 am - 5:30 pm

Funded by a grant from the Library of Congress, the Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) program at the University of the Arts creates professional development opportunities for K-12 educators. TPS-UArts courses introduce educators, librarians and administrators to the digital archives and teaching resources available through the Library of Congress website, in order to identify and use primary source material in the classroom. Educators, librarians and school administrators learn inquiry-based tactics to guide students through analysis of primary sources, resulting in stronger higher-order and critical thinking skills.

Non-credit classes are TUITION FREE. Graduate credit for these courses is available at a 50% reduced tuition rate. Please note: All participants (credit and non-credit) are required to pay a non-refundable $50 materials fee at the time of registration.

Please note that for administrative reasons, the date range reflected below each course does not correspond with the course's actual meeting times. All TPS classes meet Monday, August 5 - Friday, August 9, 2019. Click on the session to view each course's meeting dates & details.


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Courses

Using type specimens, printed ephemera, and design examples from the Library of Congress digital collections, participants will trace histories, narratives, and connection in parallel with our diverse cultural experiences and visual language. The invention of movable type created an explosion of shared knowledge, history, and visual language that continues to evolve in contemporary culture. This course will explore meaning and subject matter through type design. Collaborative exercises will encourage participant to think critically about how type and design shapes our language and visual culture. Site visits include collections in the Philadelphia region, and guest lectures. Content is appropriate to a range of subject areas, from art and design, to literacy, history, science and technology.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Using type specimens, printed ephemera, and design examples from the Library of Congress digital collections, participants will trace histories, narratives, and connection in parallel with our diverse cultural experiences and visual language. The invention of movable type created an explosion of shared knowledge, history, and visual language that continues to evolve in contemporary culture. This course will explore meaning and subject matter through type design. Collaborative exercises will encourage participant to think critically about how type and design shapes our language and visual culture. Site visits include collections in the Philadelphia region, and guest lectures. Content is appropriate to a range of subject areas, from art and design, to literacy, history, science and technology.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
This course provides a general overview of the history of comics and graphic novels, particularly as a medium for storytelling and social commentary in the United States, using the resources of the Library of Congress. Participants consider visual literacy, basic narrative techniques, the combination of image and text, as historical context to better understand and analyze this art form. Participants in this course will plan lessons around this visual resource, exploring the potential impact to engage students with discussions and creative activities. Projects include researching and evaluating comic resources, group readings and discussions, hands-on drawing and printing activities, lesson plan development and more. Content is appropriate to a range of subject areas as connections to history, social science, identity, artistic expression and visual literacy are explored.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
This course provides a general overview of the history of comics and graphic novels, particularly as a medium for storytelling and social commentary in the United States, using the resources of the Library of Congress. Participants consider visual literacy, basic narrative techniques, the combination of image and text, as well as historical context to better understand and analyze this art form. Participants in this course will plan lessons around this visual resource, exploring the potential impact to engage students with discussions and creative activities. Projects include researching and evaluating comic resources, group readings and discussions, hands-on drawing and printing activities, lesson plan development and more. Content is appropriate to a range of subject areas as connections to history, social science, identity, artistic expression and visual literacy are explored.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Documentary films often depend on primary archival source  and later themselves become primary sources for studying the culture, technology, history and aesthetics of the time in which they were made. This course explores the role of archival sources within documentary through screenings, discussions and projects using the Library of Congress collection Selections from the National Film Registry.  Educators will produce a short film that draws upon this resource and, in the process, learn about research techniques, non-linear editing and ethics around archival usage. Lessons that may be brought forward to students include the artistic and/or historical possibilities of working with such resources and best practices for using online research tools. There will also be a discussion of rights and Fair Use.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Documentary films often depend on primary archival source  and later themselves become primary sources for studying the culture, technology, history and aesthetics of the time in which they were made. This course explores the role of archival sources within documentary through screenings, discussions and projects using the Library of Congress collection Selections from the National Film Registry.  Educators will produce a short film that draws upon this resource and, in the process, learn about research techniques, non-linear editing and ethics around archival usage. Lessons that may be brought forward to students include the artistic and/or historical possibilities of working with such resources and best practices for using online research tools. There will also be a discussion of rights and Fair Use.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
STEM education is based four specific disciplines - science, technology, engineering and mathematics - taught in an interdisciplinary, applied approach. STEAM education recognizes that the arts is an essential part of developing creative and critical thinking skills. In this course, educators will connect with primary source collections and artists who take STEM to STEAM. Teaching with primary sources allows educators to design student-centered learning experiences focused on the development of critical skills and building content knowledge. Educators will examine primary sources from direct access to local collections as well as the digital resources made available by the Library of Congress. Site visits include collections in the Philadelphia region and a studio visit with a contemporary artist.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
STEM education is based four specific disciplines - science, technology, engineering and mathematics-taught in an interdisciplinary, applied approach. STEAM education recognizes that the arts is an essential part of developing creative and critical thinking skills. In this course, educators will connect with primary source collections and artists who take STEM to STEAM. Teaching with primary sources allows educators to design student-centered learning experiences focused on the development of critical skills and building content knowledge. Educators will examine primary sources from direct access to local collections as well as the digital resources made available by the Library of Congress. Site visits include collections in the Philadelphia region and a studio visit with a contemporary artist.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.