UArts Professional & Continuing Education Course Registration

Teaching with Primary Sources Courses at the University of the Arts

Funded by a grant from the Library of Congress, Teaching with Primary Sources-UArts courses introduce K-12 teachers, librarians and school administrators to the digital collections and resources available through the Library of Congress. Educators in TPS-UArts courses learn inquiry-based tactics to guide students through the analysis of primary sources, resulting in stronger higher-order and critical thinking skills. These courses seek to enhance cross-curricular learning by helping educators incorporate arts-based primary resources into dynamic classroom experiences.

Non-credit courses are tuition free. Graduate credit for these courses is available at a 50% reduced tuition rate. Please note: All participants (credit and non-credit) are required to pay a non-refundable $50 materials fee at the time of registration.


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Using type specimens, printed ephemera, and design examples from the Library of Congress digital collections, participants will trace histories, narratives, and connection in parallel with our diverse cultural experiences and visual language. The invention of movable type created an explosion of shared knowledge, history, and visual language that continues to evolve in contemporary culture. This course will explore meaning and subject matter through type design. Collaborative exercises will encourage participant to think critically about how type and design shapes our language and visual culture. Site visits include collections in the Philadelphia region, and guest lectures. Content is appropriate to a range of subject areas, from art and design, to literacy, history, science and technology.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Using type specimens, printed ephemera, and design examples from the Library of Congress digital collections, participants will trace histories, narratives, and connection in parallel with our diverse cultural experiences and visual language. The invention of movable type created an explosion of shared knowledge, history, and visual language that continues to evolve in contemporary culture. This course will explore meaning and subject matter through type design. Collaborative exercises will encourage participant to think critically about how type and design shapes our language and visual culture. Site visits include collections in the Philadelphia region, and guest lectures. Content is appropriate to a range of subject areas, from art and design, to literacy, history, science and technology.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
In the 1930s, the United States was in crisis. The economic system had collapsed and one-quarter of the country's workforce was unemployed. In an effort to rebuild the nation, President Franklin D. Roosevelt launched the 'Works Progress Administration' (WPA) to put millions of jobless people back to work. To promote its vast social programs, the WPA commissioned 500 artists nationwide to created more than 35,000 posters and prints to reach the American public. Of the mere 2,000 posters known to still exist, the Library of Congress' collection is the largest. These striking silkscreen, lithograph and woodcut posters publicized health programs, cultural programs, theatrical and musical performances, travel, education and community activities throughout the U.S. The posters were made possible by one of the first U.S. Government programs to support the arts and were added to the Library's holdings in the 1940s. In this course, learn about the WPA - its artists and its mission - and its connection to history, art, social science and visual literacy that can enrich your teaching. Participants learn about this time period, the power of design to communicate and how to use visual primary sources to engage students. In addition to museum visits, design studio exercises and hands-on printmaking, participants will use the digital archives of the Library of Congress to prepare lessons based on these powerful historic images. Content is appropriate for every subject areas as connections to art, nature, history, material processes and literacy are explored.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
In the 1930s, the United States was in crisis. The economic system had collapsed and one-quarter of the country's workforce was unemployed. In an effort to rebuild the nation, President Franklin D. Roosevelt launched the 'Works Progress Administration' (WPA) to put millions of jobless people back to work. To promote its vast social programs, the WPA commissioned 500 artists nationwide to created more than 35,000 posters and prints to reach the American public. Of the mere 2,000 posters known to still exist, the Library of Congress' collection is the largest. These striking silkscreen, lithograph and woodcut posters publicized health programs, cultural programs, theatrical and musical performances, travel, education and community activities throughout the U.S. The posters were made possible by one of the first U.S. Government programs to support the arts and were added to the Library's holdings in the 1940s. In this course, learn about the WPA - its artists and its mission - and its connection to history, art, social science and visual literacy that can enrich your teaching. Participants learn about this time period, the power of design to communicate and how to use visual primary sources to engage students. In addition to museum visits, design studio exercises and hands-on printmaking, participants will use the digital archives of the Library of Congress to prepare lessons based on these powerful historic images. Content is appropriate for every subject areas as connections to art, nature, history, material processes and literacy are explored.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.