UArts Professional & Continuing Education Course Registration

Professional Institute for Educators Courses

Graduate-level courses in arts, inclusion, literacy, & ed tech for K-12 teachers.

Course pricing includes $1,050 tuition + a nonrefundable course fee: $50 fee for subject codes ETEC, INCL, LITY, and STET; $100 fee for subject codes VPAS, STTA.


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Have you heard about 3D printing and wondered, how can I get started in my classroom? Have you tried 3D printing, yet you are looking for some guidance around its sustained use and utiliy? Some examples of 3-D printing in the classroom include topography, complex molecules, architectural designs, cross-sections of organs, artifacts, prototypes, modified robot parts? the list is boundless! In this course, you will learn how to print in 3-D, and how to make 3-D printing a reality in your classroom.


August 3-7, 2020, TBA - University of the Arts
Continue to refine advanced throwing skills with stoneware clays that explore both traditional and experimental techniques to make functional and sculptural pots. This course provides an opportunity for personal invention, exploration and expression while improving technical skills and competency in thinking and working three-dimensionally. Learn to incorporate these new methods into the classroom to enrich the conceptual skills and craftmanship of your students.


June 22-26, 2020, Wayne Art Center
In this studio-focused course, participants with previous tile-making experience learn more refined techniques to create tile and mosaic constructions as well as more advanced approaches to developing an understanding of material culture and history in the curriculum. Lectures and field trips consider the history of tile making as an art form. Explore useful lessons for K-12 teachers in all subjects to bring clay and tile projects to engage students of all ages. Course includes studio time at a local tile-making studio.


July 20-24, 2020, Goggleworks Center for the Arts
This course explores both traditional and experimental throwing techniques to make functional and sculptural pots. Develop a repertoire of skills, improve competency in thinking and working three-dimensionally, and incorporate new methods to encourage craftsmanship and conceptual skills in students. This course provides an opportunity for personal invention and exploration in developing sound skills to take back to the classroom. Learn throwing techniques with stoneware clays for both the beginning and advanced student. In addition, discover finishes experimenting with colored slips, under glazes, oxides, shop glazes and firing techniques.


June 22-26, 2020, Wayne Art Center
With further refinement and exploration, develop advanced throwing skills with stoneware clays. Use both traditional and experimental throwing techniques to make functional and sculptural pots. In addition, expand knowledge of firing techniques and finishes with colored slips, under glazes, oxides and shop glazes. This course provides an opportunity for personal invention, higher-level challenges and advanced critique in throwing. Improve competency in thinking and working three-dimensionally and bring these skills into the classroom. Prerequisite: 3-D Projects for the Classroom: Ceramics-Throwing Introductory (VPAS 510)


June 22-26, 2020, Wayne Art Center
Create large and small-scale ceramic mosaic constructions through the use of line drawings, freehand sketches, slide transfers or with computer assistance. Learn techniques such as plaster mold castings for tile replication opportunities, the use of plastic patterns or one of-a-kind fabrications. Mounting and hanging are covered as well. Content open to all teachers with an interest in producing tiles; application to classroom use is considered.


July 20-24, 2020, Goggleworks Center for the Arts
Develop advanced skills in ceramic tile and mosaics, using techniques involving plaster mold castings for tile replication, as well as various glazing options. Build your personal repertoire of tile and mosaic skills, and learn how to think and work three-dimensionally. Projects are adaptable for K-12 teachers across content areas.


July 20-24, 2020, Goggleworks Center for the Arts
Participants expand on projects using fabrication techniques such as hollow construction, linkage, chain making, forming and fabrication. This course furthers the process of working with metals and the understanding of the technical requirements needed to bring these skills into the curriculum. Content applicable to K-12 art classrooms, particularly to expand knowledge of 3-D concepts and construction with students.


August 3-7, 2020, TBA - University of the Arts
This course is an introduction to traditional jewelry techniques and metalwork. Participants learn basic fabrication techniques such as hollow construction, linkage, chain making, forming and fabrication. With demonstrations, discussions and hands-on projects, this course provides an overview to the vocabulary


August 3-7, 2020, TBA - University of the Arts
Further advance your abilities in the process of working with metals and understanding of the technical requirements needed to bring these skills into the curriculum. Participants expand on projects using fabrication techniques such as hollow construction, linkage, chain making, forming and fabrication. Projects are adaptable for K-12 students, particularly in the areas of knowledge of 3D concepts and construction.


August 3-7, 2020, TBA - University of the Arts
This course is for educators looking to go beyond a basic understanding of iPad use in the classroom. Learn how to manage your students' workflow, and take advantage of the iPad's advanced capabilities, including productivity apps, assessment apps and subject-specific and special-needs apps. The course is arranged around 'app task challenges' that provide an opportunity for teachers to use apps in combination to create sophisticated projects and interactive presentations.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Are you looking to expand your knowledge of- and ways to best facilitate- blended and flipped learning? We will explore multiple ways to optimize- and to comfortably and appropriately balance- classroom time and at-home time within blended and flipped formats. Begin to experiment with flipped classroom practices using free classroom resources. Learn how to flip learning in any environment, even with limited online access and/or limited devices. How might you use structures that are already in place, such as stations and clusters, to tailor the best learning experience for students in your classroom? Open to K-12 educators who have experience at all levels of blended learning and flipped classroom implementation.


June 22, 2020 to July 20, 2020, Online
Are you already using blended/flipped models, but would like to learn about new resources and strategies that will help to further engage your students? In this class, we will learn how to optimize blended/flipped models to personalize learning and encourage student ownership. We will dive deeper into how student control of place, path, and/or pace of learning ultimately leads to more successful outcomes. In addition to the traditional flipped classroom, we will explore optimization of the in-class flip and station rotations. Teachers will create original video recordings and podcasts of digital lessons/lectures of content that are most conducive to blended practices. Open to all K-12 educators who have basic experience with blended learning and/or flipped classroom implementation.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
This course provides strategies for managing individual student and group behavior in the classroom. Develop a framework for understanding why children behave as they do in a classroom setting. Major concepts such as the drive to belong, private logic, birth order, goals of misbehavior, logical consequences, reflective listening, questioning skills and class meetings are explored. Examine types of patterns in students' behaviors: attention getting, power struggles, revenge actions, and students who appear to be academically disabled but are not. Additionally, consider the links between the way adults respond to misbehaving children and how that response either feeds, extinguishes or has no effect on the target behavior. This course is a study of understanding for an inclusive classroom and examining adult response patterns to children's misbehavior. Techniques include discussion, lecture, self-reflection, and case study evaluation of real life classroom situations. Practical application for K-12 teachers in all subject areas.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Creating a classroom community through music, dance and theater introduces strategies for educators to incorporate elements of arts-based thematic instruction. Educators will use guided discovery, movement, imagery, spatial concepts, choreography, musical and rhythmic accompaniment and group theater games to promote positive relationships and academic achievement. This course will be facilitated by the instructor within a collaborative and cooperative framework, building upon current educational philosophies and practices, including Responsive Classroom. Instruction will be transparent, in that educators will be engaged in learning activities, which they may choose to adapt to meet the needs and developmental levels of their own students. Each class session will begin with a Circle of Power and Respect, interactive activities, and processing techniques derived from Restorative Practices. Application of learning from previous courses will be integrated into daily reflections and into the final project. Educators will collaboratively prepare projects in class and will be expected to continue this creative process outside of class, refining their thematic unit/'work of art' and reflecting on classroom experience. Educators will be encouraged to actively participate in theater games and activities, experiment with various theater techniques, and design theater, dance or music-based thematic units integrating standards-based curriculum and IEP goals.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Gain a thorough understanding of Design Thinking principles through hands-on techniques and exercises to take back to the classroom. Course participants will prototype solutions to problems of practice. Central to the course is the question, how can Design Thinking be used to teach 21st century skills creativity, communication, collaboration, and critical thinking?


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Digital technologies are ever-changing, and come with a set of risks and rewards for your students. Having 'the world at your fingertips' is both wonderful and daunting. This course will help you lead students within today's digital environment, including guidance around the appropriate and safe use of digital tools both inside and outside of the classroom.


July 27, 2020 to August 13, 2020, Unionville Elementary School
Teachers, librarians and reading specialists can learn to enrich student awareness and appreciation of diverse cultures though literature centered on the experiences of African American, Hispanic, Asian and Middle Eastern cultures. Participants read Zora Neale Hurston, Chris Soentpiet, Faith Ringgold, Mildred D. Taylor and the poetry of Joyce Carol Thomas, Paul Laurence Dunbar and Langston Hughes, focusing on their incorporation into cross-curricular studies.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Does your school use Google Apps for Education, but you are unsure as to how to best use it to serve your classroom needs? Do you have a basic understanding of Google Apps. but would love to know more? Would you benefit from exploring Google Apps' formative assessment features and terrific assignment feedback functions? How about the ease of data collection, analysis and interpretation? Creating and building educator communities? This course will serve as a jumping off point as to how Google Apps will integrate seamlessly into the classroom experience for you and your students.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
This course outlines the fundamentals of Adobe Illustrator for use in middle and high school classrooms. Participants will develop practical strategies to integrate software skills into lessons as a foundation for ongoing design exploration with students. Participants will learn the basics of image resolution, scanning, image import/export, print setup, and photo adjustments. Participants will gain an understanding of how this design program works for different types of design projects and the ability to create basic design projects and activities that reinforce concepts, vocabulary, and design principles to students in the classroom.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
The introduction of the iPad brought the power and functionality of a full-size computer system into a lightweight, user-intuitive, powerful mobile tablet. While educators have rapidly embraced the iPad to meet computing needs and fill niche roles, discover how iPad technology can increase engagement and unlock vast content. We will use tablets and their applications to explore the development of grade-appropriate lessons across a wide range of subjects and content areas. Consider how the iPad can be a fully integrated professional tool for your classroom, and explore the financial resources for bringing iPad technology into schools and Districts.


July 7, 2020 to August 4, 2020, Online
Media education adds value to just about every curriculum in the K-12 classrooms. Media education has become a growing priority in today's classroom because of the extent of the media's importance in people's lives. However, many teachers are unaware of the necessity and the techniques for making media literacy an integral part of the K-12 educational experience. On average, children in their middle and high school years spend 6-10 hours a day engaged either actively or passively in a 'media related' activity. Because students, regardless of their learning style, attend more fully to activities and ideas that they connect with, the media is often used to influence them from a very young age. This makes it necessary for teachers to 'train' their students to analyze messages and understand the techniques utilized to influence them via a broad range of sound and visual communication technologies. Integrating Media Literacy into Today's K-12 Curriculum will teach educators how to incorporate media literacy into the classroom curriculum, regardless of the subject taught. This course will provide educators with the resources necessary to help students hone their critical thinking skills in a functional context so that they are able to recognize various marketing approaches, identify propaganda, understand stereotypes, critically evaluate media conveyed messages, and use the media as a tool for life-long learning.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
This course shows how a single computer can be the essential resource in a teacher's repertoire. Use it as a learning tool by building a daily rotation of student activities on the computer. Use it as a personal productivity tool by developing databases, spreadsheets and mail merges. Use it as a presentation tool to display slide shows created in Apple iWorks' presentation feature, and use the Internet to explore a whole world of information.


July 9, 2020 to August 6, 2020
While Powerpoint and Prezi are options, they are nowhere near the only options, with which to create interactive presentations for use in today's classroom. Browser-based applications present countless presentation features to help foster student engagement, interaction, assessment, and communication. This course will explore the web's potential for interactivity, including slideshows and videos, back channeling, 3-D, animations, interactive whiteboards, screencasting, online debates, collaboration, and brainstorming tools. All applications introduced in the course are free, with iPad-approved options available for those teachers who use them in their classrooms.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Have you ever been approached by your colleagues as a technology resource in the classroom? Have you ever been asked to deliver a technology training session? Do you see yourself as the technology lead at your school? You will leave this course with the ability to design and deliver technology direction and optimize digital learning environments both within the classroom and across your school or District. We will explore the history of modern-day educational technology, the psychology of media, and the relationship of each to your role as an ed tech leader and advocate. Our final project will be a research-based technology plan for your school or District.


July 14, 2020 to August 11, 2020, Online
Think critically about our connection with the natural world and how its roots are embedded in history - from medicinal gardens and landscape architecture to seed catalogues and United States currency. Using primary sources from the Library of Congress to explore these histories, narratives and links to plants, participants will study the centuries-old traditions of botanical illustration and horticulture, as well as present-day community gardens. Through observation, collaboration and hands-on exploration, gain a deeper understanding of horticultural practices and history, sustainability, conservation and more. Further discovery will come from site visits to local collections and museums and guest lectures from experts. Content is appropriate for a range of subject areas including art, design, history, science and technology.


August 3-7, 2020, TBA - University of the Arts
Think critically about our connection with the natural world and how its roots are embedded in history - from medicinal gardens and landscape architecture to seed catalogues and United States currency. Using primary sources from the Library of Congress to explore these histories, narratives and links to plants, participants will study the centuries-old traditions of botanical illustration and horticulture, as well as present-day community gardens. Through observation, collaboration and hands-on exploration, gain a deeper understanding of horticultural practices and history, sustainability, conservation and more. Further discovery will come from site visits to local collections and museums and guest lectures from experts. Content is appropriate for a range of subject areas including art, design, history, science and technology.


August 3-7, 2020, TBA - University of the Arts
With Office 365, educators will learn how to become more innovative with cloud-based tools, regardless of the device they use. This course is aimed at educators for whom Office 365 is relatively new and who are looking to implement solutions to classroom problems right away. This course will explore Office 365 through hands-on activities that will introduce educators to OneDrive for Business, Office Online, Microsoft Teams, Forms, Sway, and OneNote as well as get a high-level overview of other tools that can enhance a classroom environment and accessibility.


July 8, 2020 to August 5, 2020, Online
Educators can now empower their students to connect, create, and collaborate online. Explore the use of technology as a tool to engage students in constructive critical thinking about the subjects they study. User-friendly Web 2.0 tools, tools provide opportunities for educators and students to communicate and interact in new, collaborative ways. Lesson guides provide practical examples of techniques to integrate these online tools into the curriculum.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
In the 1930s, the United States was in crisis. The economic system had collapsed and one-quarter of the country's workforce was unemployed. In an effort to rebuild the nation, President Franklin D. Roosevelt launched the 'Works Progress Administration' (WPA) to put millions of jobless people back to work. To promote its vast social programs, the WPA commissioned 500 artists nationwide to created more than 35,000 posters and prints to reach the American public. Of the mere 2,000 posters known to still exist, the Library of Congress' collection is the largest. These striking silkscreen, lithograph and woodcut posters publicized health programs, cultural programs, theatrical and musical performances, travel, education and community activities throughout the U.S. The posters were made possible by one of the first U.S. Government programs to support the arts and were added to the Library's holdings in the 1940s. In this course, learn about the WPA - its artists and its mission - and its connection to history, art, social science and visual literacy that can enrich your teaching. Participants learn about this time period, the power of design to communicate and how to use visual primary sources to engage students. In addition to museum visits, design studio exercises and hands-on printmaking, participants will use the digital archives of the Library of Congress to prepare lessons based on these powerful historic images. Content is appropriate for every subject areas as connections to art, nature, history, material processes and literacy are explored.


August 3-7, 2020, TBA - University of the Arts
In the 1930s, the United States was in crisis. The economic system had collapsed and one-quarter of the country's workforce was unemployed. In an effort to rebuild the nation, President Franklin D. Roosevelt launched the 'Works Progress Administration' (WPA) to put millions of jobless people back to work. To promote its vast social programs, the WPA commissioned 500 artists nationwide to created more than 35,000 posters and prints to reach the American public. Of the mere 2,000 posters known to still exist, the Library of Congress' collection is the largest. These striking silkscreen, lithograph and woodcut posters publicized health programs, cultural programs, theatrical and musical performances, travel, education and community activities throughout the U.S. The posters were made possible by one of the first U.S. Government programs to support the arts and were added to the Library's holdings in the 1940s. In this course, learn about the WPA - its artists and its mission - and its connection to history, art, social science and visual literacy that can enrich your teaching. Participants learn about this time period, the power of design to communicate and how to use visual primary sources to engage students. In addition to museum visits, design studio exercises and hands-on printmaking, participants will use the digital archives of the Library of Congress to prepare lessons based on these powerful historic images. Content is appropriate for every subject areas as connections to art, nature, history, material processes and literacy are explored.


August 3-7, 2020, TBA - University of the Arts
Participants in this course continue the exploration of a variety of a contemporary book structures to which writing an imagery can be added. This includes accordian variations, sewn books, flexagons and pop-ups. Projects and discussions include approaches to incorporate images with simple text to convey meaning within various types of books. Collaborative book projects for classroom use and the opportunity to create a personal book are developed. Classroom applications for all grade levels are addressed; projects are adaptable for K-12 students in many subject areas.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Participants in this course are introduced to a variety of contemporary book structures to which writing and imagery can be added. This includes accordion variations, sewn books, flexagons and pop-ups. Projects and discussions include approaches to incorporate images with simple text to convey meaning within various types of books. Collaborative book projects for classroom use and the opportunity to create a personal book are developed. Classroom applications for all grade levels are addressed; projects are adaptable for K-12 students in many subject areas.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
This class addresses image making through printmaking media, such as relief, monoprinting and collographs. Create images by drawing/painting directly on the plate or by working from a sketch. The creative process is analyzed at every point, with water-based inks and multiple colors as well as working with non-traditional presses that can be used in a variety of classroom settings.


June 22-26, 2020, Wayne Art Center
Continue to refine advanced techniques in image making through printmaking medium, monoprinting using relief and collograph techniques. Participants will primarily concentrate on one of the processes to address formal issues such as mark, color and scale. The class will also focus on how printmaking and multiples can be used to further one's visual language by drawing and collaging into the printed image. Techniques can be applied in a variety of classroom settings.


June 22-26, 2020, Wayne Art Center
This course addresses image-making through basic printmaking media such as monoprinting, with some relief printing techniques, that can be used in a classroom without specialized equipment or presses. Create images by drawing or painting directly on the plate or by working from a sketch; the creative process is analyzed at every point. Techniques covered printing with water-based inks and multiple colors as well as working with non-traditional presses that can be used in a variety of classroom settings.


June 22-26, 2020, Wayne Art Center
Explore a variety of reading, writing, speaking and literature experiences designed to encourage students. This course helps classroom or reading teachers discover national programs and new avenues and strategies including: making children independent and reflective learners, interactive instruction, teaching across the curriculum, alternative assessment, divergent teaching strategies and interdisciplinary teaching.


July 6, 2020 to August 3, 2020, Online
Emotional intelligence is a missing link in our educational curriculum. Teachers are given the tools for sharing academic lessons, but often they are ill-equipped to handle the stress that the students bring with them. SEL prescribes approaching students as complex human beings whose learning and behavior are just as impacted by their emotions, and their control over those emotions, as they are by the quality of instruction and discipline. However, social-emotional competencies need to be taught. The SEL approach involves teaching students how to manage emotions and behaviors to achieve one's goals; recognize one's emotions and values as well as one's strengths and challenges; show understanding and empathy for others; form positive relationships, working in pairs and teams, dealing effectively with conflict; recognize and talk about their feelings; and resolve conflicts peacefully as a way to strengthen both academic achievement and emotional stability. The course will provide teachers with a practical framework that incorporates morning and class meetings, literature, video examples, creative dramatics and conflict resolution to implement the non-cognitive skills that will stimulate thinking and bonds among children that will carry over into their academic curriculum.


June 24, 2020 to July 22, 2020, Online
Creativity saturates science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics (STEAM). Integrated learning is a powerful means of facilitating meaningful learning. The artistic process and the scientific method are more complementary than one might imagine- both facilitate the exploration of ideas and possibilities. Both involve "process" and "product." Both require students to engage in creative and critical thinking that supports collaborative learning. This course will explore STEAM integration models, in which you will test lessons and tools to facilitate a STEAM-inspired curriculum. You will have the flexibility to select specific areas of STEAM that are most relevant to your own classroom and teaching style. You will emerge with the confidence and skill to authentically integrate across STEAM content.


July 20, 2020 to August 6, 2020, Unionville Elementary School
Many children with disabilities are now integrated into regular classroom environments that include the use of technology. Learn how to address these students and their needs through specific technology tools and adaptations to improve student learning. Discuss ways to identify physical, emotional and learning disabilities and apply methods and approaches to assist in teaching. Develop practical implementation of tailored adjustments to physical space, implement useful software tools and downloads that can make projects more accessible and integrate built-in digital speech capabilities and other tools to assist students. Course includes discussions, case studies, role playing and hands-on digital projects.


August 3-13, 2020, Unionville Elementary School
This course champions the importance of affirming the cultural identities of students and helping educators to respect cultural differences in others. Participants develop resources, tools and methods to increase cultural awareness in the classroom across the curriculum. Activities encourage students to understand and honor diversity, both in their schools and within the larger community. This course focuses on methods to weave tolerance and understanding into existing curricular units and lesson plans.


July 6, 2020 to August 10, 2020, Online
Refine and improve techniques relating to digital photography, expanding overall photographic competency and aesthetic sensibility. Composition, lighting and subject are discussed and critiqued as participants create a cohesive body of work with the final goal a series of project-based photographs. Some basic postproduction techniques using Photoshop are introduced. Participants must bring a digital SLR camera and a portable storage device. (or have access to a cloud based image storage service.)


August 3-7, 2020, TBA - University of the Arts
Explore, refine and improve general techniques relating to digital photography, including camera functions, image storage and final output options. In addition, composition, lighting and subject are discussed and critiqued. Some basic post-production techniques using Photoshop are also introduced. Participants must bring a digital SLR camera and a portable storage device.


August 3-7, 2020, TBA - University of the Arts
Expand drawing and painting skills at a more advanced level. Working from direct observation, including some figure models, participants improve perception and technical skills, working both in drawing media and in paint. Create a range of times pieces in basic drawing media such as charcoal, pencil, ink and conte crayon, then move on to more advanced work using acrylic paints. This course considers color theory, composition, painting technique, and the overall process and includes in-depth critiques.


August 3-7, 2020, TBA - University of the Arts
This drawing and painting course provides the opportunity to further refine color theory and design concepts using a variety of media at an advanced level. Apply an understanding composition and fluency with materials to work both in the abstract and from direct observation. Educators will focus on the refinement of a series of pieces to build a body of work that reflects an advanced understanding of techniques specific to the two-dimensional visual arts. Educators will develop drawing and painting activities to incorporate into projects for the K-12 classroom.


August 3-7, 2020, TBA - University of the Arts
Drawing and painting are foundational skills for visual literacy and for developing an understanding of form, composition, light and color. Working from direct observation, including some figure models, participants improve perception and technical skills working both in drawing media and in paint. Create a range of timed pieces in basic drawing media such as charcoal, pencil, ink and conte crayon, then move on to more advanced work using acrylic paints. This course considers color theory,composition, painting technique, and the overall process.


August 3-7, 2020, TBA - University of the Arts
Explore landscape painting at a more advanced level. Working in the field, participants discuss themes inherent in this subject matter, evaluate the effects of light and color, and refine specific techniques. As weather permits, work outdoors in the Bucks County landscape with expansive vistas to consider. This course takes into account the immediacy of changing conditions while working en plein air. Participants work from direct observation and consider techniques that achieve desired results. Choice of media may be oil, acrylic or pastel. Topics include mediums and techniques for the efficient use of time, analyzing composition, color studies, reading weather and light conditions, and basic color mixing. Course content and critiques applicable to art classroom instruction.


June 22-26, 2020, Wayne Art Center
Continue to refine advanced techniques with an emphasis on an in-the-field approach to landscape as subject matter. In addition to producing finished paintings, discuss this genre and the themes in it, including the concept of place, scale, the nature of light, and the balance of man and nature. Work outdoors in the local area to address the process of working with the immediacy of changing conditions. Participants may choose oil, acrylic or pastel for their medium and present a series of thematic pieces. Course content and critiques applicable to art classroom instruction.


June 22-26, 2020, Wayne Art Center
Emphasis will be on an 'in the field' approach to landscape as subject matter. In addition to producing finished paintings, participants will discuss this genre and the themes often illustrated in it, including the concept of place, scale, the nature of light, and the balance of man and nature. As weather permits, participants will work outdoors to address the process of working with the immediacy of changing conditions. Participants will work from direct observation and cover concepts in landscape composition that will help them achieve their desired results. Choice of media may be oil, acrylic or pastel. Topics include: proper grounds (surfaces) for oil paint, materials, mediums, and techniques for the efficient use of the time, how to use a loose drawing to form a strong composition; and making color studies. Participants will also discuss choosing a location, reading the weather, reading the light, and color mixing for landscape. This course is intended for educators with previous experience in basic drawing and painting. All course content will be directly applicable to classroom instruction and curriculum for art educators.


June 22-26, 2020, Wayne Art Center
What is "wearable technology" and how does it apply to your classroom? Wearable technology, or wearables, wearable devices, even tech togs-consists of clothing and accessories that incorporate advanced technologies that have practical functions and features. This course is designed for educators looking to integrate wearables such as the AppleWatch into the classroom for hands-on learning. Educators will leave this course with the ability to identify and use wearables for various learning activities, design lesson plans that integrate learning activities that involve wearables, explore the history of wearables and learning, and understand privacy implications with wearables.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.
Learn how and where to find the most effective educational resources on the web, including lesson plans, model education sites, and presentation tools. This course enables novices and advanced users to explore web-based active learning and consider methods to incorporate skills into lessons. Learn web page/simple website creation skills as well as the latest presentation techniques using multi-media tools, slide shows, and concept mapping.


This course contains no sessions
Click here to be notified about the next scheduled program.