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Professional Institute for Educators Courses

Graduate-level courses in arts, inclusion, literacy, & ed tech for K-12 teachers.

Please note that the date range reflected below each course may not correspond with actual meeting times. Click on the session to view each course's meeting dates & details.


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Have you heard about 3D printing and wondered, how can I get started in my classroom? Have you tried 3D printing, yet you are looking for some guidance around its sustained use and utiliy? Some examples of 3-D printing in the classroom include topography, complex molecules, architectural designs, cross-sections of organs, artifacts, prototypes, modified robot parts? the list is boundless! In this course, you will learn how to print in 3-D, and how to make 3-D printing a reality in your classroom.


July 29, 2019 to August 14, 2019, Unionville Elementary School
In this studio-focused course, participants with previous tile-making experience learn more refined techniques to create tile and mosaic constructions as well as more advanced approaches to developing an understanding of material culture and history in the curriculum. Lectures and field trips consider the history of tile making as an art form. Explore useful lessons for K-12 teachers in all subjects to bring clay and tile projects to engage students of all ages. Course includes studio time at a local tile-making studio.


June 24, 2019 to July 5, 2019, Wayne Art Center
Create large and small-scale ceramic mosaic constructions through the use of line drawings, freehand sketches, slide transfers or with computer assistance. Learn techniques such as plaster mold castings for tile replication opportunities, the use of plastic patterns or one of-a-kind fabrications. Mounting and hanging are covered as well. Content open to all teachers with an interest in producing tiles; application to classroom use is considered.


June 24, 2019 to July 5, 2019, Wayne Art Center
Develop advanced skills in ceramic tile and mosaics, using techniques involving plaster mold castings for tile replication, as well as various glazing options. Build your personal repertoire of tile and mosaic skills, and learn how to think and work three-dimensionally. Projects are adaptable for K-12 teachers across content areas.


June 24, 2019 to July 5, 2019, Wayne Art Center
Explore the techniques of Raku firing and the qualities of this approach, with an emphasis on more refined projects, focused critiques and the more advanced aspects of the medium to convey an artistic message. Participants develop work in a series and consider its application to the classroom.


July 22, 2019 to August 2, 2019, Goggleworks Center for the Arts
With further refinement and exploration, expand the techniques of Raku firing and the qualities of this approach, with an emphasis on more advanced projects, focused critiques and the more subtle aspects of the medium to convey an artistic message. Participants develop work and consider application to younger students. This course provides an opportunity for personal invention and higher level challenges through developing a series of pieces. Improve competency in thinking and working three-dimensionally.


July 22, 2019 to August 2, 2019, Goggleworks Center for the Arts
Raku is a form of Japanese pottery that uses low firing temperatures and removal from the kiln while still hot, creating a unique surface finish often with crackled textures. Raku techniques have been adopted and modified by contemporary potters worldwide. In this course, explore the techniques of Raku firing and the qualities of this approach.


July 22, 2019 to August 2, 2019, Goggleworks Center for the Arts
Using type specimens, printed ephemera, and design examples from the Library of Congress digital collections, participants will trace histories, narratives, and connection in parallel with our diverse cultural experiences and visual language. The invention of movable type created an explosion of shared knowledge, history, and visual language that continues to evolve in contemporary culture. This course will explore meaning and subject matter through type design. Collaborative exercises will encourage participant to think critically about how type and design shapes our language and visual culture. Site visits include collections in the Philadelphia region, and guest lectures. Content is appropriate to a range of subject areas, from art and design, to literacy, history, science and technology.


August 5-16, 2019, TBA
Using type specimens, printed ephemera, and design examples from the Library of Congress digital collections, participants will trace histories, narratives, and connection in parallel with our diverse cultural experiences and visual language. The invention of movable type created an explosion of shared knowledge, history, and visual language that continues to evolve in contemporary culture. This course will explore meaning and subject matter through type design. Collaborative exercises will encourage participant to think critically about how type and design shapes our language and visual culture. Site visits include collections in the Philadelphia region, and guest lectures. Content is appropriate to a range of subject areas, from art and design, to literacy, history, science and technology.


August 5-16, 2019, TBA
This course provides a general overview of the history of comics and graphic novels, particularly as a medium for storytelling and social commentary in the United States, using the resources of the Library of Congress. Participants consider visual literacy, basic narrative techniques, the combination of image and text, as historical context to better understand and analyze this art form. Participants in this course will plan lessons around this visual resource, exploring the potential impact to engage students with discussions and creative activities. Projects include researching and evaluating comic resources, group readings and discussions, hands-on drawing and printing activities, lesson plan development and more. Content is appropriate to a range of subject areas as connections to history, social science, identity, artistic expression and visual literacy are explored.


August 5-16, 2019, TBA
This course provides a general overview of the history of comics and graphic novels, particularly as a medium for storytelling and social commentary in the United States, using the resources of the Library of Congress. Participants consider visual literacy, basic narrative techniques, the combination of image and text, as well as historical context to better understand and analyze this art form. Participants in this course will plan lessons around this visual resource, exploring the potential impact to engage students with discussions and creative activities. Projects include researching and evaluating comic resources, group readings and discussions, hands-on drawing and printing activities, lesson plan development and more. Content is appropriate to a range of subject areas as connections to history, social science, identity, artistic expression and visual literacy are explored.


August 5-16, 2019, TBA
Gain a thorough understanding of Design Thinking principles through hands-on techniques and exercises to take back to the classroom. Course participants will prototype solutions to problems of practice. Central to the course is the question, how can Design Thinking be used to teach 21st century skills creativity, communication, collaboration, and critical thinking?


July 15-29, 2019, TBA
This core course provides educators with an understanding of the unique opportunities and challenges technology brings to the design of teaching and learning environments. The course examines micro and macro learning environments and what, in particular, makes learning environments successful. While not a technology course per se, certain digital tools will be explored, demonstrated and tested to exemplify the vast possibilities available for teaching and learning across multiple settings. Focus on collaboration, accessibility, motivation, and authentic learning as key to the design of modern learning environments.


July 8-30, 2019, Unionville Elementary School
The course is an introduction to digital writing, designed for 5th-12th grade educators.  Educators will explore and implement instructional strategies around digital writing through diverse digital expressions that engage educators in writing grounded within highly digital lives. You will focus on in-depth guidance and feedback to help your students craft digital writing, replete with technology resources and tools for creating a wide range of digital writing activities, units, and assessments.


June 19, 2019 to July 17, 2019, Online
Frequent feedback is central to learning. Frequent feedback as part of a formative assessment strategy supports students to do work that they are proud of, and motivates students to meet challenges. This course focuses on relevant, real-time, personal, practical feedback to inform different stages of the learning process. In what ways can you provide feedback that students will build on, understand, and use? You will test a host of free technologies that support formative assessment and help to create a classroom culture of feedback grounded in student interests, passions, and authentic response.


June 11, 2019 to July 2, 2019, Online
Do you use Google Apps for Education in your classroom, and want to know more? Go beyond Docs, Sheets, Sites, and Hangouts, and deeper into Google Apps. Explore Google Classroom (which helps teachers create and organize assignments quickly, provide feedback efficiently, and easily communicate with students and across classrooms), Google Expeditions (virtual field trips), Communities ('clubs' that are moderated and have a particular focus), Programs (eg Google Teacher Academy) and other resources for your students. This course was developed to address both day-to-day and longer-term classroom needs and interests using Google Apps.


August 5-14, 2019, Unionville Elementary School
This course outlines the fundamentals of Adobe Photoshop for use in middle and high school classrooms. Participants will develop practical strategies to integrate software skills into lessons as a foundation for ongoing design exploration with students. Participants will learn the basics of image resolution, scanning, image import/export, print setup, and photo adjustments. Participants will gain an understanding of how this design program works for different types of design projects and the ability to create basic design projects and activities that reinforce concepts, vocabulary, and design principles to students in the classroom. Each day will include design lecture, software skill demonstration, and studio time for in-class exercises and projects. This in-class work will be supplemented with materials including video tutorials and readings.


August 5-16, 2019, TBA
This course will provide educators with ways to use art and therapeutic strategies to engage students with important issues in their world and in themselves. In the Barnes Foundation's galleries, teachers will learn practical guidelines for their own self-care and how to use mindfulness with slow looking at art. The four-day institute features hands-on workshops and exclusive access to the art collection as well as a guided tour of the special exhibition:I Do Not Know What It Is I Am Like: The Art of Bill Viola. Ceramic artist Roberto Lugo will discuss how he incorporates contemporary social justice issues within his work. Lisa Kay, of Temple University's Tyler School of Art, will discuss her new book: Therapeutic Approaches to Art Education. Participants will preview 30 Americans, an exhibition opening October 2019, showcasing influential African-American artists, including Kehinde Wiley, Kara Walker, and Nick Cave, and receive materials to prepare to visit that exhibition with their students. The Institute emphasizes an arts-integrated approach to lesson plan development. Teachers will be immersed in the objective method of the Barnes Foundation, and learn teaching strategies that help students develop their visual-literacy skills. Resources for classroom lessons will be provided, including lesson plans and ideas for integrating art across the curriculum into content areas such as: English Language Arts, Math, Science, and Social Studies. Teachers can earn Act 48 credit by completing a Student Learning Objective (SLO) assignment or earn graduate credit by completing a five-lesson SLO project.


July 22, 2019 to August 2, 2019, Off site
This course shows how a single computer can be the essential resource in a teacher's repertoire. Use it as a learning tool by building a daily rotation of student activities on the computer. Use it as a personal productivity tool by developing databases, spreadsheets and mail merges. Use it as a presentation tool to display slide shows created in Apple iWorks' presentation feature, and use the Internet to explore a whole world of information.


July 2-30, 2019, Online
Documentary films often depend on primary archival source  and later themselves become primary sources for studying the culture, technology, history and aesthetics of the time in which they were made. This course explores the role of archival sources within documentary through screenings, discussions and projects using the Library of Congress collection Selections from the National Film Registry.  Educators will produce a short film that draws upon this resource and, in the process, learn about research techniques, non-linear editing and ethics around archival usage. Lessons that may be brought forward to students include the artistic and/or historical possibilities of working with such resources and best practices for using online research tools. There will also be a discussion of rights and Fair Use.


August 5-16, 2019, TBA
Documentary films often depend on primary archival source  and later themselves become primary sources for studying the culture, technology, history and aesthetics of the time in which they were made. This course explores the role of archival sources within documentary through screenings, discussions and projects using the Library of Congress collection Selections from the National Film Registry.  Educators will produce a short film that draws upon this resource and, in the process, learn about research techniques, non-linear editing and ethics around archival usage. Lessons that may be brought forward to students include the artistic and/or historical possibilities of working with such resources and best practices for using online research tools. There will also be a discussion of rights and Fair Use.


August 5-16, 2019, TBA
This class addresses image making through printmaking media, such as relief, monoprinting and collographs. Create images by drawing/painting directly on the plate or by working from a sketch. The creative process is analyzed at every point, with water-based inks and multiple colors as well as working with non-traditional presses that can be used in a variety of classroom settings.


June 24, 2019 to July 5, 2019, Wayne Art Center
Continue to refine advanced techniques in image making through printmaking medium, monoprinting using relief and collograph techniques. Participants will primarily concentrate on one of the processes to address formal issues such as mark, color and scale. The class will also focus on how printmaking and multiples can be used to further one's visual language by drawing and collaging into the printed image. Techniques can be applied in a variety of classroom settings.


June 24, 2019 to July 5, 2019, Wayne Art Center
This course addresses image-making through basic printmaking media such as monoprinting, with some relief printing techniques, that can be used in a classroom without specialized equipment or presses. Create images by drawing or painting directly on the plate or by working from a sketch; the creative process is analyzed at every point. Techniques covered printing with water-based inks and multiple colors as well as working with non-traditional presses that can be used in a variety of classroom settings.


June 24, 2019 to July 5, 2019, Wayne Art Center
Participants expand on projects using stencil methods in screen printing with water-based inks. Course includes idea development and application of visual skills in expression of color, line and form through drawn, photographic or computer-generated stencil processes. emphasis is on the acquisition of personal expression and technical skills, within the capabilities of screen printed opaque and transparent colors. Content is applicable to K-12 art classrooms.


August 5-16, 2019, TBA
This course is an introduction to methods in screen printing with water-based inks. Demonstrations in screen printing techniques are followed by hands-on work in stencil preparation, mixing of pigments, registration processes, pulling a print and presentation, including development and application of various hand-cut and photo stencils. Course includes idea development and application of visual skills in expression of color, line and form through drawn, photographic or computer-generated stencil processes. Emphasis is on the acquisition of personal expression and technical skills, within the capabilities of screen printed opaque and transparent colors. Content is applicable to K-12 art classrooms. 


August 5-16, 2019, TBA
The course focus is on current trends and issues in special education as related to both high and low incidence disabilities. Students will have the opportunity to complete individual projects of interest and at the same time strengthens their ability to advocate for positive change across multiple areas of special education and related services. The course uses a collaborative and cooperative framework built upon current educational philosophies and practice, including Responsive Classroom and Circle of Power and Respect. Students will have time and space to prepare projects in class with peer and instructor assistance, and will be expected to extend research and synthesis outside of class, refining practice and reflecting on classroom experiences. Active participation is encouraged through lively discussions and activities in which students will take on multiple perspectives in order to connect with each other, develop empathy, and brainstorm ideas to create and support a more inclusive classroom.


June 17, 2019 to July 15, 2019, Online
Growth Mindset, a concept originated by Carol Dweck of Stanford University, encourages students to: embrace challenge, surround yourself with others who will challenge you to grow and get out of the comfort zone. Growth mindset is built around reflective practice- What did I do? What did I learn? What can I do next? In this course, educators will learn about and apply to their own classrooms the process of taking informed risks and learning from the results. Educators will walk away with at least three concrete strategies to help their own students stick with problems, seek out different solutions, use feedback as an opportunity for growth, and build confidence for exuberant discovery.


July 8, 2019 to August 5, 2019, Online
Creativity saturates science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics (STEAM). Integrated learning is a powerful means of facilitating meaningful learning. The artistic process and the scientific method are more complementary than one might imagine- both facilitate the exploration of ideas and possibilities. Both involve "process" and "product." Both require students to engage in creative and critical thinking that supports collaborative learning. This course will explore STEAM integration models, in which you will test lessons and tools to facilitate a STEAM-inspired curriculum. You will have the flexibility to select specific areas of STEAM that are most relevant to your own classroom and teaching style. You will emerge with the confidence and skill to authentically integrate across STEAM content.


July 22, 2019 to August 12, 2019, Unionville Elementary School
STEM education is based four specific disciplines - science, technology, engineering and mathematics - taught in an interdisciplinary, applied approach. STEAM education recognizes that the arts is an essential part of developing creative and critical thinking skills. In this course, educators will connect with primary source collections and artists who take STEM to STEAM. Teaching with primary sources allows educators to design student-centered learning experiences focused on the development of critical skills and building content knowledge. Educators will examine primary sources from direct access to local collections as well as the digital resources made available by the Library of Congress. Site visits include collections in the Philadelphia region and a studio visit with a contemporary artist.


August 5-16, 2019, TBA
STEM education is based four specific disciplines - science, technology, engineering and mathematics-taught in an interdisciplinary, applied approach. STEAM education recognizes that the arts is an essential part of developing creative and critical thinking skills. In this course, educators will connect with primary source collections and artists who take STEM to STEAM. Teaching with primary sources allows educators to design student-centered learning experiences focused on the development of critical skills and building content knowledge. Educators will examine primary sources from direct access to local collections as well as the digital resources made available by the Library of Congress. Site visits include collections in the Philadelphia region and a studio visit with a contemporary artist.


August 5-16, 2019, TBA
Does your school or District have a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy, but you would like to know more about how to optimize this policy in your own classroom or school? Regardless of whether your school or District has a 1:1 initiative, this course will immerse educators in collaborative lesson design using a multitude of devices students bring to and explore in class. We will evaluate a range of BYOD mindtools that, when routinely implemented, will enable you and your students to construct your own media-rich understandings of class materials. We will develop strategies and in-class practices around the design of learning environments in the age of BYOD.


July 3, 2019 to August 1, 2019, Online
Each summer the Philadelphia Museum of Art's Division of Education offers K-12 teachers of all subject areas the chance to renew their spirit of inquiry through VAST: Visual Arts as a Source for Teaching. This program allows teachers to immerse themselves in the museum's collections and its use as a resource in the classroom, with themes changing each summer. The collections serve as the starting point for lively experiences that stress an interdisciplinary and multicultural approach in looking at and teaching from works of art. Participants take part in lectures, demonstrations, small group discussions, behind-the-scenes meetings with museum curators, writing workshops and field trips to build skills and strategies for teaching humanities-based curriculum. This summer we will explore the lessons that art and the art museum can teach us about inclusivity and individuality. What does it mean to be an insider? What does it mean to be an outsider? Experiment with object-based teaching strategies for building a culture of diversity, equity, and inclusion in the classroom and beyond.


July 8-23, 2019, Philadelphia Museum of Art
Children and young adults has grown up in a media-drenched environment, full of appropriation. It is second nature to young people to create and curate personal collections of these images. Collage and assemblage as an art practice seeks to recontextualize that collective imagery to be presented in thoughtful and communicative ways. In this course, educators will learn to create collages and assemblages that communicate a focused message. We will explore the ways in which collage and assemblage has been used across cultures and by various artists. We will discuss the environmental and socioeconomic benefits to the art form, using recycled, salvaged, and personal imagery and artifacts to create works of art. Educators will come away with a deep appreciation for meaning in everyday objects and materials for artistic expression. 


August 5-16, 2019, TBA
Refine and improve techniques relating to digital photography, expanding overall photographic competency and aesthetic sensibility. Composition, lighting and subject are discussed and critiqued as participants create a cohesive body of work with the final goal a series of project-based photographs. Some basic postproduction techniques using Photoshop are introduced. Participants must bring a digital SLR camera and a portable storage device. (or have access to a cloud based image storage service.)


August 5-16, 2019, TBA
Expand drawing and painting skills at a more advanced level. Working from direct observation, including some figure models, participants improve perception and technical skills, working both in drawing media and in paint. Create a range of times pieces in basic drawing media such as charcoal, pencil, ink and conte crayon, then move on to more advanced work using acrylic paints. This course considers color theory, composition, painting technique, and the overall process and includes in-depth critiques.


August 5-16, 2019, TBA
This drawing and painting course provides the opportunity to further refine color theory and design concepts using a variety of media at an advanced level. Apply an understanding composition and fluency with materials to work both in the abstract and from direct observation. Educators will focus on the refinement of a series of pieces to build a body of work that reflects an advanced understanding of techniques specific to the two-dimensional visual arts. Educators will develop drawing and painting activities to incorporate into projects for the K-12 classroom.


August 5-16, 2019, TBA
Drawing and painting are foundational skills for visual literacy and for developing an understanding of form, composition, light and color. Working from direct observation, including some figure models, participants improve perception and technical skills working both in drawing media and in paint. Create a range of timed pieces in basic drawing media such as charcoal, pencil, ink and conte crayon, then move on to more advanced work using acrylic paints. This course considers color theory,composition, painting technique, and the overall process.


August 5-16, 2019, TBA
Explore landscape painting at a more advanced level. Working in the field, participants discuss themes inherent in this subject matter, evaluate the effects of light and color, and refine specific techniques. As weather permits, work outdoors in the Bucks County landscape with expansive vistas to consider. This course takes into account the immediacy of changing conditions while working en plein air. Participants work from direct observation and consider techniques that achieve desired results. Choice of media may be oil, acrylic or pastel. Topics include mediums and techniques for the efficient use of time, analyzing composition, color studies, reading weather and light conditions, and basic color mixing. Course content and critiques applicable to art classroom instruction.


June 24, 2019 to July 5, 2019, Wayne Art Center
Continue to refine advanced techniques with an emphasis on an in-the-field approach to landscape as subject matter. In addition to producing finished paintings, discuss this genre and the themes in it, including the concept of place, scale, the nature of light, and the balance of man and nature. Work outdoors in the local area to address the process of working with the immediacy of changing conditions. Participants may choose oil, acrylic or pastel for their medium and present a series of thematic pieces. Course content and critiques applicable to art classroom instruction.


June 24, 2019 to July 5, 2019, Wayne Art Center
Emphasis will be on an 'in the field' approach to landscape as subject matter. In addition to producing finished paintings, participants will discuss this genre and the themes often illustrated in it, including the concept of place, scale, the nature of light, and the balance of man and nature. As weather permits, participants will work outdoors to address the process of working with the immediacy of changing conditions. Participants will work from direct observation and cover concepts in landscape composition that will help them achieve their desired results. Choice of media may be oil, acrylic or pastel. Topics include: proper grounds (surfaces) for oil paint, materials, mediums, and techniques for the efficient use of the time, how to use a loose drawing to form a strong composition; and making color studies. Participants will also discuss choosing a location, reading the weather, reading the light, and color mixing for landscape. This course is intended for educators with previous experience in basic drawing and painting. All course content will be directly applicable to classroom instruction and curriculum for art educators.


June 24, 2019 to July 5, 2019, Wayne Art Center
Explore, refine and improve general techniques relating to digital photography, including camera functions, image storage and final output options. In addition, composition, lighting and subject are discussed and critiqued. Some basic post-production techniques using Photoshop are also introduced. Participants must bring a digital SLR camera and a portable storage device.


August 5-9, 2019, TBA
Learn how and where to find the most effective educational resources on the web, including lesson plans, model education sites, and presentation tools. This course enables novices and advanced users to explore web-based active learning and consider methods to incorporate skills into lessons. Learn web page/simple website creation skills as well as the latest presentation techniques using multi-media tools, slide shows, and concept mapping.


June 18, 2019 to July 16, 2019, Online